This Day & Date Service Could Change Everything (Pt. 2)

In Pt. 1, I talked about how Silicon Valley startup XCINEX plans to offer movies in people’s homes the same day they open in movie theaters by charging per viewer and by providing inexpensive hardware that monitors how many people are watching the film. 

 

The third box XCINEX checks is not pissing off local exhibitors by drawing down their attendance numbers. XCINEX will pay back 95% of the ticket price to the studio supplying the content, and the studio in turn will pay a percentage of this to the local exhibitor showing the film. Specifics, such as whether the viewer gets to select a specific theater he normally frequents or if XCINEX or the studio just finds the closest theater and assumes they would get the cash, still need to be worked out.

 

In fact, XCINEX will have no control over ticket pricing. Instead, the content provider will determine the price. Atkins explained this model could be geographical—say, more expensive in New York than Iowa—or even priced more expensively during certain times.

 

In practice, renting a movie from XCINEX looks pretty straight-forward. You open the XCINEX app on your smart phone and purchase the required number of tickets for the movie you want to see. Once the purchase transaction is completed, you’re issued a unique session ID. You then open an app on a device like a smart TV, Apple TV, Roku, or Chromecast and enter the ID. The Venue then authenticates the number of viewers and your movie starts. The Venue hardware will continue monitoring the room throughout the showing, looking for new sets of eyes or a potentially nefarious recording device. If one is detected, the film will pause and then you’ll either be instructed to purchase an additional ticket or put the camera down.

XCINEX

Once rented, the movie is good for a single viewing—but you can pause, rewind some short amount of time (30 seconds to a minute), and fast forward. Should somebody have to leave during the middle, they could even “check out” of the movie, and then check back in at a different location to continue viewing the film where they left off.

 

XCINEX says content delivery will be handled by Deluxe, with security will be handled by Verimatrix. There was no mention of the quality level of each film, whether the service will support 4K, HDR, Dolby Atmos, etc. or what kind of Internet download speeds would be required for service.

 

Atkin told me that while he can’t go on record saying any studios have agreed to provide content, he did say XCINEX has strong relationships with all major studios, that he expects participation from major studios as well as independent partners, and he anticipates providing a strong lineup of content.

 

XCINEX plans to launch in 2019. The company is currently securing funding, which will be followed by 8 to 12 months of development prior to launch. Atkins speculates that the service will initially roll out in rural markets where there will be less exhibitor friction and there isn’t generally a lot of cinema attendance.

 

Stay tuned as this could prove to be one of the most exciting movie developments of next year!

John Sciacca

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

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