Kaleidescape Tag

How to Tame a Media Room Pt. 2

For those without the space or budget for building a dedicated home theater, a media room can be the best solution. But media rooms typically have several distracting drawbacks that most dedicated rooms don’t. In Part One of this series, I tackled the biggest distraction media-room owners face: Light.

 

Here we’re going to tackle the second biggest distraction: Visible electronics.

 

In a dedicated room, whether the lights are on or off, the room is designed to focus all attention on the screen. Whether through a stage, proscenium, curtain, angled walls, color scheme, or rows of carefully positioned seats, a well-designed dedicated theater blocks out all external distractions. And this definitely includes eliminating stacks of distracting electronics.

 

But it’s different with most media rooms. They not only don’t have the luxury of focusing all attention on the screen, they’re often hampered by having a cabinet filled with electronics sitting below the screen. (I will definitely cop to being guilty of this design issue.) Besides taking away from the look of the room, a rack full of electronics features an array of blinking and twinkling lights that are not only distracting but can rob the image of contrast. But with a little planning, your room doesn’t need to be hindered by having all the gear on display.

media room solutions

Solution 1: Hide the Gear

For the most part, the gear doesn’t care where it lives. Give your electronics a place with nice ventilation and they’re just as happy being in a closet or equipment room on the other side of the house as they are right below the TV. Obviously, wiring costs are more expensive since you’ll need longer cable runs, and some itemssuch as a 4K-capable HDMI-over-Cat6 baluncan be costly. But this is a small, one-time price to pay for an eternity of uncluttered space.

 

The bigger issue is controlling the gear. Since it will no longer be right in front of you, you obviously won’t be able to just point a remote at the system. Fortunately, this is a simple and easy proposition that doesn’t have to break the bank. And, honestly, if you’re working with a media designer/installer that hasn’t made a universal control system part of your bid, RUN!

 

The least expensive solution is an infrared control system. These are readily available, cost about $250, and work with any brand of remote control.

 

But it’s far more reliable to use a control system that communicates via radio frequency (RF). These systems don’t require pointing at an infrared target and often incorporate advanced features like RS-232 and IP control over electronics, giving two-way feedback such as which source is selected and displaying the current volume level. Also, many RF systems can be integrated into a larger whole-home automation system, letting you also control your lights, HVAC, security, etc. Your installer will likely suggest a model from a company like Control4, Crestron, RTI, Savant, or URC.

 

Solution 2: Ditch Physical Media

With the gear out of sight in another room, no one is going to want to traipse across the house every time they want to put a new movie into the Blu-ray player. And while streaming services like Vudu, Netflix, Amazon, and Apple can provide content in 4K, the highest performance solution is going with a media server like Kaleidescape’s Strato.

 

We’re big fans of the Strato here at the Roundtable because it delivers all the quality of the physical disc with none of the storage and handling requirements, or the limitations of streaming. Movies are downloaded to your local hard drive, giving you instant access to all your content. Perfect!

media room solutions

Solution 3: Hide the Speakers

At a minimum, a surround sound system will feature 5.1 speakers. But the current trend is to use 11.1 (or more!) speakers for a fully immersive Dolby Atmos system. That is a lot of speakers to conceal in a room. Or is it?

 

Every speaker manufacturer you can think of designs a series of in-wall and in-ceiling speakers. These fit inside standard 2×4 wall cavities and mount flush to the wall or ceiling. And a ton of R & D and technology have gone into these designs to ensure that quality isn’t lost over form. Modern speaker grilles also feature bezel-less designs that call little attention to it. These grilles can then be painted to blend into the wall or ceiling color, virtually vanishing. We’ve even done projects where painters painted the grilles to match the room’s wallpaper!

 

Speakers can also be installed into cabinetry, columns, or panels, hidden behind acoustically transparent cloth that lets all their sound pass thru unaffected. Some speaker manufacturers like Monitor Audio even make speakers that resemble framed works of art, covered in a variety of prints and images.

 

In Part 3, I’ll discuss how to overcome the next biggest media-room distractionthe display.

—John Sciacca

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

Blade Runner: The Final Cut

Kaleidescape Blade Runner

Blade Runner is one of those movies people seem to either love or hate. On the one hand, Ridley Scott created a richly detailed and developed world that feels dark, gritty, real, and fleshed out in nearly every sense. On the other, the movie is a bit slow and plodding, light on action, and weighted down with its own mythology.

 

Beyond incredible set design, what Blade Runner really has going is a terrific performance by Harrison Ford. Remember that BR was released in 1982 at the height of Ford’s stardom, when he was coming off two massive Star Wars films and the first Raiders movie. Here, his portrayal of rogue-replicant hunter Rick Deckard has none of the cocksure swagger or wry humor of Solo or Indy, but rather is a man living a dark, solitary existence, taking no joy in his job, and frequently finding solace in alcohol. He’s a much deeper, darker, more real hero than what is normally portrayed.

 

The film also has one of the most tortured pasts when it comes to versions, with alternate cuts, and approvedand non-approveddirector’s cuts. In fact, there’s a fair bit of debate over which version one should actually watch, or if the full Blade Runner immersion requires viewing all and taking bits and pieces from each. I myself have journeyed with BR for years, having watched the LaserDisc and owned the DVD and Blu-ray. And while you can read about all of the various versions here, I can tell you the definitive one is the new 4K HDR version available for download now at the Kaleidescape store.

 

While only Ridley Scott’s 2007 The Final Cut (or 25th Anniversary Edition) receives the full Ultra HD makeover, the download gives you access to the US Theatrical Cut, International Theatrical Cut, Director’s Cut, and Work Print, along with hours of supplemental material to complete your Blade Runner journey. And let me assure you, no matter how many times you’ve seen the movie, or how you felt about it on prior viewings, this is an entirely new Blade Runner experience. The film looks and sounds better than ever, and it’s especially timely given the recent release of the sequel, Blade Runner 2049.

 

The movie underwent an extensive restoration for the Ultra HD conversion, with much of the original footage scanned at 4K resolution and some of the 65mm effects footage scanned at 8K. There was also a frame-by-frame digital cleanup, the film has been re-color-timed to Scott’s specifications, and the remixed audio received the full Dolby Atmos treatment.

Kaleidescape Blade Runner

The result is a stunningly clean and magnificent-looking movie with virtually no grain or noise, with fine details apparent in nearly every shot. The HDR has been used to great effect, with solid, stable, and noise-free blacks and with neon lights and bright colors popping from the screen.

 

I’d forgotten how much of the movie was really a video torture test, with many scenes shot in darkly lit, often smoky interiors with bright lights piercing in from windows. This would normally reveal tons of banding and other video nasties, or have details totally lost in the dynamic-range contrast crush, but UHD’s higher bit rate keeps everything solid and pristine. Going back and comparing the look of this film to the original DVD version reveals the shocking level of care and restoration that has been taken, with the DVD marred by a sea of noise, grain, and age.

 

The Atmos audio mix is also used to greatly enhance the film, with many environmental sounds and Vangelis’ score mixed to the overhead speakers to great effect. I’d forgotten how it almost constantly rains in Los Angeles in 2019, but this plays right into Atmos’ overhead channel strengths. The bass mix is also quite dynamic, with deep, powerful explosions that will give your subs a workout.

 

While this transfer might not make Blade Runner your favorite film, it will definitely command your attention for its 117-minute run time. Download and enjoy it today!

—John Sciacca

 

Minor spoiler . . .

It has long been a “was he, wasn’t he?” argument regarding Deckard, with even Ridley Scott and Harrison Ford differing on their take. One thing I really noticed in the 4K version of the film was how Deckard’s eyes glowed in a specific scene when talking to Rachelsomething that happens to all replicants in the film and which would seem to clearly indicate Deckard is one. Was this an intentional color change by Scott, or perhaps a subtle detail just brought out by the better transfer?

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

Kaleidescape’s CEO On The New Apple TV 4K

Apple seriously expanded awareness of 4K yesterday when it announced a long-overdue refresh of its Apple TV, the Apple TV 4K. The new Apple 4K will come in 32- and 64-GB sizes for $179 and $199, and the A10X powered devices will feature Dolby Vision and HDR10, Gigabit Ethernet, an HDMI 2.0a output, and “up to Dolby Digital Plus 7.1 surround sound” (same as the previous generation model.)

 

On the content side, Apple announced that iTunes users will get automatic free upgrades of HD titles in their existing iTunes library to 4K HDR when the new version becomes available, and that 4K HDR titles will sell for the same price as HD titles.

 

The market leader in 4K HDR content delivery is Kaleidescape, which has deals with nearly all the major studios and offers more than 260 full-quality UHD titles for download. I had a chance to chat with Kaleidescape’s CEO and co-founder, Cheena Srinivasan, following the Apple TV announcement to discuss what he thought about Apple’s entry into this space.

How do you feel about Apple embracing 4K?

 

The overall take for me is, how could this be bad news? The Apple TV 4K is a differentiated productit’s like a Swiss Army knife. It’s a multi-purpose device. It’s for the mass market. And it’s going to increase the general awareness for 4K HDR. We need a big player like Apple embracing 4K and HDRwe haven’t had it until now. We need to let them do the democratizing and let us focus on delivering the best flavor of it.

 

By Apple embracing 4K, it ensures a good chunk of library titles could be remastered and re-released in 4K, and assures that almost every new-release movie will come out in superior qualitywhich will mean these titles will also be available in this best quality to Kaleidescape customers for purchase.

 

What are the differences between 4K in the mass market and in the high end?

 

When you look at a product that is geared for mass-market consumption, you’re playing on brand recognition4K must mean it’s better. HDR must stand for better color, vivid colors, and eye popping images. That says nothing about picture quality, that says nothing about audio quality, or any guarantee of quality of service that this will be pristine, predictable playback every time. The discerning customer is the one who wants the best every time.

 

We have taken the polar opposite view of a mass-market service in what we do. We make very deliberate choices in how we transcode the video, add lossless audio, and various other unique things we do, such as event cues for control-system automation, favorite scenes, etc., before we make the movie available for sale to ensure the playback is pristine every single time, and that there are no glitches, audio drops, artifacts, etc.

 

What do you say to somebody who points out that Apple is charging the same price for HD and 4K content?

 

If you take the Sony/Kaleidescape partnership and what we bring to consumers in terms of the promise of quality 4K video, there is no question that we deliver with confidence the highest fidelity video, audio, immersive cinematic experience. Period. But that comes at a price.

 

That Apple’s 4K HDR is the same as its HD price gives me two signals. One says, the marginal differences between the two formats are dictated by the TV you own and you shouldn’t be punished for owning a better TV by charging you a higher amount. And the second says if there isn’t substantial differentiation between HD and 4K HDR, it’s hard to justify the price difference. I don’t think it makes any sense for us to just mimic someone else’s pricing strategy, because we stand by the value differentiation we deliver.

—John Sciacca

 

Click here to read my complete interview with Cheena

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

Sony & Kaleidescape Push 4K Hard

Sony Kaleidescape partnership

(from L to R) Sony Electronics President & COO Mike Fasulo,
Sony Electronics VP of AV Specialty/Custom
Integration Frank Sterns,
Kaleidescape founder/CEO Cheena Srinivasan

The annual CEDIA (Custom Electronics Design and Installation Association) show was held last week in San Diego. Besides the beautiful, sunny weather and abundance of craft beer, the major players in the A/V industry were on hand demonstrating their latest products. Over the next couple of posts, I’ll share some of the things that caught my eye with the Roundtable reader in mind.

 

One of the big announcements at the show was the new strategic partnership between Sony and Kaleidescape. Sony has been a leader in 4K, and is one of the few companies with a complete 4K ecosystem capable of delivering a true “lens to screen” experience. As Roundtable readers know, Kaleidescape is focused on delivering the ultimate home theater experience, with a movie-download store offering hundreds of movies in 4K Ultra HD resolution and thousands in full Blu-ray quality.

 

The two companies realized they could form a symbiotic partnership, with Sony’s 4K projectors delivering a terrific cinematic picture and Kaleidescape Strato players (shown below) feeding those systems with the best theatrical 4K HDR content.

Sony Kaleidescape partnership

The companies are offering a joint promotion where any Strato customer who buys a qualifying Sony 4K HDR projector between now and 3/31/18 can download a movie bundle featuring ten 4K HDR movies from the Kaleidescape store valued up to $350. Conversely, existing Sony 4K HDR projector owners who buy a Strato movie player can get the movie bundle to jumpstart their collections.

 

Kaleidescape founder and CEO Cheena Srinivasan commented: “We’re pleased to partner on this promotion with Sony, the company that’s synonymous with 4K innovation and shares our vision for delivering the finest picture and sound quality.”

 

Qualifying projectors include the VPL-VW285ES, VW365ES, VW385ES, VW675ES, VW885ES, VZ1000ES, and VW5000ES (shown above), with models ranging from $5,000 to $50,000. Coupled with a Strato, this means a terrific “starter” 4K HDR theater package can be had for under $10,000. Both companies expect this offer to reach thousands of customers and expand the reach of 4K-projection adoption.

 

The movie bundle, which includes Spider-man: Homecoming, has been designed to deliver the ultimate 4K HDR experience to home theater enthusiasts and features a mix of classic and new releases from the major studious, including Sony, Universal, 20th Century Fox, and Warner Brothers.

—John Sciacca

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

“Warrior” and “Southpaw”

Kaleidescape Warrior

If you watched or visited a sports or news Web site recently, you undoubtedly heard about the Floyd Mayweather Jr./Conor McGregor super fight this past weekend in Las Vegas. While the fight seemed to go mostly accordingly to everyone’s plan, it went a solid ten rounds, and seems to have lived up to the hype and given the fans a good show.

 

Inspired by this massive spectacle, I’ve got a couple of recommendations this week that are sure to entertain: Warrior and Southpaw.

 

Released in 2011, Warrior features a terrific cast that includes Joel Edgerton, Tom Hardy, and Nick Nolte, and follows estranged brothers Brendan (Edgerton) and Tommy Conlon (Hardy) as they train for a massive, winner-take-all MMA tournament. The fights in the octagon are hard, fast, and real, yet the action is all PG-13, so they aren’t too bloody and brutal. The acting and pacing keep you involved and invested over the film’s 2 hours and 20 minute run time, and the DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1-channel track puts you right in the ring with crowd noise and solid connection of blows, as the movie builds to the inevitable brother-on-brother climax.

 

Southpaw (2015) follows practically every cliché formula in the book yet manages to be incredibly entertaining, dramatic, and enjoyable nonetheless. Directed by Antoine Fuqua, an avid boxer himself, the movie is filled with heart and has a terrific script with believable dialogue that keeps it from seeming like another retread. The supporting cast of Forest Whitaker, who throws himself into the role of trainer, Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson, who ably handles the role of sleazy agent/promoter, and Rachel McAdams as the concerned wife, helps to create a fully rounded story. But it’s Jake Gyllenhaal in the leading role of Billy Hope that truly shines. Gyllenhaal got his body ripped and shredded for this role, put in a ton of training to move and fight like a fighter, and terrifically conveys Hope’s troubled I’ll-do-anything-to-get-back quest for redemption. And while “only” 1080p, the film has some terrific video detail. Check out the pool scene where Jordan Mains (Jackson) is talking to Mo’ (McAdams), and look at the fine pattern detail and texture in Mains’ jacket and hat. Stunning!

 

Both films are available in Blu-ray-quality download from the Kaleidescape Movie Store, and will be sure to entertain both boxing/fighting fans and non- alike!

—John Sciacca

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

The Heartaches of Movie Collecting & Streaming

John Sciacca’s piece about his problems streaming movies on Netflix really struck a chord with me, so I’ve decided to share some of my own experiences.

 

I’m an avid collector of movies. (The video above will give you a good idea of exactly how avid I am.) Over the years, I’ve bought enough DVDs and Blu-ray discs that I’ll never have to worry about running out of movies to see. Instead, I’m worrying about running out of space! There’s no more room left on the shelves of my storage room. 

 

To solve the problem, I got a Kaleidescape player and transferred most of my DVDs onto it. This not only alleviated the storage problem, it also made my whole collection instantly accessible. With my entire collection at my fingertips, I started watching movies I hadn’t seen in years.

movie collecting

I’ve also started discovering various streaming services and, in the process, have became less dependent on physical media. I’ve found titles for streaming that I’ve always wanted to see that aren’t available on DVD or Blu-ray.

 

And as a diehard collector, I don’t rent themI buy them. Not because I have money to burn, but because whether on Netflix, Amazon Prime, or any other streaming service, a title can be available one day and gone the next. So, to make sure I can always see a movie when I’m in the mood for it, instead of renting, I buy.

 

But that doesn’t really solve the problem. Buying a movie from a streaming service instead of renting doesn’t guarantee you’ll always have access to it. A service can lose the rights to a titleor group of titlesor even go out of business completely. The only way to avoid losing what you’ve bought is to download and store the movies on a hard drive so you’ll always have them. That’s the ultimate protection for anal collectors like me. 

 

Now, if I could only find the time to start downloading all those titles . . . It never ends.

—Theo Kalomirakis

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,ooo discs. Theo is the
Executive Director of Rayva.

Netflix, Where Are My Movies?

Netflix movie streaming

If you follow the news, you might have heard a fairly big announcement from Walt Disney Studios earlier this month. At the company’s latest earnings report, Disney announced plans to remove all its movies from Netflix’ streaming service at the end of 2018. This will include all Pixar titles and likely Marvel films, though Marvel TV shows will remain. (Lucasfilm titlesnow owned by Disneyhave never been available for streaming on Netflix.) The announcement caused Netflix’ stock price to drop more than 6%.

 

Beyond the loss of film content for the streaming giant, this brings up another perfect argument for downloading and owning a beloved film instead of trying to stream it. Forget about all the quality and performance issues—the transitory nature of streaming licenses means content can definitely be here today and gone tomorrow. And try explaining contract shifts, licensing agreements, and content negotiations to your 5 year old when she’s crying out to watch Frozen for the umpteenth time!

Netflix Movie Streaming

Further, the illusion for many users is that they’ll be able to watch any movie they desire when streaming on Netflix. While that’s true for Netflix’ enormous disc-by-mail rental library—a service I’ve used since the company’s inception—it’s decidedly not the case with streaming.

 

In fact, perusing the AFI Top 100 Movies list reveals that Netflix only has 7 of the movies available for streaming. No Citizen Kane (No. 1), no The Godfather or The Godfather Part II (No. 2 and No. 32), no Jaws (No. 56), no Shawshank Redemption (No. 72), no . . . You get the point.

 

You know what never goes away? Films owned in your disc library—or stored on a hard drive on a Kaleidescape server. Those cherished movies are always there, instantly available for consumption in the best quality possible.

—John Sciacca

Netflix movie streaming

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

The Guns of Navarone

Kaleidescape Guns of Navarone

I logged in at the Kaleidescape Store last night to look for a movie I might not already have in my collection. I wasn’t looking for a new title but for a catalog title that had been upgraded to 4K. Two movies attracted my attention: The Bridge on the River Kwai and The Guns of Navarone.

 

I had seen Kwai on regular HD recently, so I settled for Navarone, which had a special emotional appeal for me. Along with a few other American productions of the ’50s, ’60s, and ’70s (like The Boy on a Dolphin, The Island of Love, It Happened in Athens, and Forty Carats), it had been shot entirely in Greece.

 

Regardless of my biases for liking this movie, The Guns of Navarone is still a very engrossing war epic. It tells the story of a team of British commandos sent to Greece during the German occupation to destroy a huge German canon that commanded a key sea channel. The movie is a solid adventure that focuses on action but not at the expense of characters. It’s as rousing today as it was when I first saw it as a kid at the Orpheum Theater in Athens.

 

I remember the movie always being grainy and dark on video. The Blu-ray release was a substantial improvement, especially in sharpness. But you can’t improve a movie much unless you go back to the original negative, and it seems that Navarone’s negative has been lost either out of neglect or overprinting.

 

The Kaleidescape 4K edition further improves the picture’s sharpness and the contrast ratio, but the grain from duping is still there. Nothing can be done about itI’m afraid this is as good as The Guns of Navarone will ever look.

—Theo Kalomirakis

Kaleidescape Guns of Navarone

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,ooo discs. Theo is the
Executive Director of Rayva.

La La Land

Kaleidescape La La Land

The buzz about La La Land before it opened was deafening. Here was a musical getting more attention than the competing superhero movies. As a big fan of the classic Hollywood musicals, I couldn’t wait to see it and judge for myself. That was last December, and I was traveling to India the same week the movie was opening in the US. I told myself I’d wait until I got back to the US in ten days to catch it.

 

I should have known better. We are living in the era of globalization, when it’s not uncommon for movies to open abroad before they open in America. As I was looking for a restaurant inside the Christmas-decorated Ambience Mall in Delhi to have dinner with my good friend Aashish Gupta, I realized that La La Land had just opened at the PVR Cinemas, a luxurious multiplex inside the mall. Needless to say, I decided we should skip dinner and catch the movie instead.

 

We didn’t regret the decision. The movie, besides reviving unabashedlyand knowinglythe tradition of song & dance musicals from the ‘40s and ‘50s, had intelligence and knowledge about the genre to spare. The bittersweet romance between a jazz musician and the aspiring actress he falls in love with had echoes of A Star is Born, The Band Wagon, An American in Paris, and The Belle of New York, among others.

 

But at the same time, it was its own moviea brilliant homage to a genre long thought gone, brought to life with loving care, conviction, and, yes, guts. The Indian audience seemed to be enjoying it with the kind of rapture reserved for their own unique genre, the Bollywood Musical. I loved it just as much except for one complaint: Although the colors were as bright and primary as in an old Technicolor musical, the print was grainy in certain shots and sometimes not as sharp as it should have been. Ah, well, I thoughtI will catch the movie in the US and figure out if it was the projection or something else.

 

When I later saw it at the BAM Cinematek, the same weak points with the print were still in evidence. I was disappointed, but I liked the movie so much that I decided to give it one last chance when it made it to disc.

 

Well, the wait was worth it. Seeing it in HD, the movie still sparkles with brilliant color but its clarity and dynamic range leave the theatrical print both in India and the US in the dust. 

 

Years ago we used to rave, “This movie is almost as good on DVD as when we saw in the theater.” How times have changed. Now, if we want to see a movie the way the director intended, we have to wait until it comes out on videoespecially on a great transfer like the one on Kaleidescape, where every bit of the picture quality is displayed on the screen just like it must have looked through the director’s viewfinder.

—Theo Kalomirakis

Kaleidescape La La Land

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,ooo discs. Theo is the
Executive Director of Rayva.

Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk

Kaleidescape Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk

Since the dawn of cinema, the established film frame rate has been 24 frames per second (fps). However, Thomas Edison said the visual cortex needed at least 46 fps to avoid eye strain. To achieve this, and eliminate any eye strain or strobing, many modern 35 mm film projectors use two- and even three-bladed shutters—flashing each frame on the screen two or three times—to achieve 48 and 72 images per second to satisfy Mr. Edison’s recommendation.

 

Yet, despite all the technological advances over the past century, all those movies you’re watching in your fancy home theater—whether via DVD, Blu-ray, and even Ultra HD Blu-ray player—are being shown at that same 24 fps.

 

Except one.

 

My latest pick for Movie of the Week is Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk, not because it’s a great film—in fact, it’s kind of a mess of a story—but because it looks so frickin’ amazing that it’s the brain and eye candy your visual cortex has been craving!

 

Billy Lynn is so impressive because director Ang Lee used an extraordinary shooting style, filming at 4K resolution in stereoscopic 3-D at 120 fps—five times the traditional rate. This is the highest frame rate ever used on a film, eclipsing the 48 fps Peter Jackson employed for The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. This approach resulted in more than 540 terabytes of dailies with a final delivery file that was 84 TB.

 

But since only six theaters in the world—including just two in the US—could actually show the film in its full glory, you probably never saw it. And since 4K/120 exceeds the Ultra HD and HDMI 2.0 spec, Billy Lynn has been released to the home market in 4K at 60 fps, the highest resolution the format can support. This high frame rate requires the full 18 Gbps bandwidth, and will lay bare any shortcomings in your system’s signal chain. But for those lucky enough to experience it in its full 4K/60 glory, Billy Lynn looks absolutely stunning and unlike any movie you’ve seen before.

 

There’s hyper clarity and focus in every shot. Tight shots on actors’ faces reveal every thought, detail, and expression down to the thinnest individual strand of hair. Fabric in actors’ uniforms reveals texture and micro stitching detail, letting you see every nuance of the patches and medals, and even analyze the diamond pattern on rifle grips. Wide shots capture every actor, building, and set piece in razor-sharp focus. One of my favorite shots happens at 6 minutes 34 seconds, where you can read details on the gravestones many rows back in the cemetery, and when the camera pans over to the service, the image remains solid and focused. 

 

From an audio standpoint, Billy Lynn includes an immersive Dolby Atmos mix that helps establish the ambience in different scenes. While the first half of the film is a bit restrained, the second half starting with the actual halftime show kicks into high gear, with the big battle scene in Chapter 11 being reference quality all the way.

 

Kaleidescape Strato owners need to be sure to download the HDR version of Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk, since that’s the 60 fps version. While you might not love the movie, it’s sure to become your go-to video demo material when you want to impress your guests and demonstrate what the fuss about 4K HDR is all about!

—John Sciacca

 

—> Check out John’s post on “How Kaleidescape Delivers Real HD”

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.