movie collecting Tag

The 5 Best Ways to Get Classic Films on Disc

The floodgates opened in 2017, with a great number of foreign, independent, and classic movies making it to video for the first time in HD. For those of us who love movies, Christmas came every week this past year. Many highly anticipated titles were released, filling our hard drives, our library on the cloud, andif you still love physical media like I doour shelves too. Here are my five favorite non-mainstream video distributors.

 

Twilight Time

Every month, this small label brings to Blu-ray limited editions of classic movies from the ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s, mainly from 20th Century Fox, Columbia, and Universal. The best way to keep up with what’s coming and preorder before it sells out is go to Screen Archives Entertainment.

films on disc

Kino Lorber Classics

Kino Lorber releases on disc classic films from United Artists, MGM, and Selznick International, plus a rich variety of titles from the ’40s and ’50s from smaller studios. Theirs is an ever-increasing library of film gems that as recently as 10 years ago you wouldn’t have imagined would ever make it to DVD—much less Blu-ray.

 

Warner Archive

Great copies on DVD of classic movies from Warner Brothers and pre-1963 MGM films. Warner Archive increased the number of its releases in HD during 2017, making fans like me rejoice.

films on disc

Cohen Media Group

This relatively new distributor distinguishes itself with the dazzling diversity of its offerings, which range from impeccably restored silent classics to mid-20th-century foreign masterpieces to the most recent European imports. If only their prices weren’t so steep.

 

Film Movement 

This subscription service releases little-known independent titles monthly.  As with Warner Archive, most of its releases are on DVD, but its new Film Movement Classics arm seems to be changing that, with selected titles coming out on Blu-ray.

—Theo Kalomirakis

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,000 discs. Theo is the
Executive Director of Rayva.

Democracy and Home Theater

I remember as a young teenager how thrilling it was to be able to own a piece of a movie I loved. It often was a lobby card I would beg a theater exhibitor to give me after the movie had ended its run. I still have hundreds of those cards that I brought with me from Greece when I moved to the US to study film at NYU. I don’t look at them oftentrying to relive my past as a movie-loving teenager is like gulping down three glasses of wine on an empty stomach. Nostalgia can go straight to my head, so I take it easy!

democracy and home theater

But there was an even stronger connection between me and movies in the late ‘60s and early ‘70sthe music of a film. Owning the soundtrack on vinyl was the next best thing to owning the movie itself. I would put Riz Ortolani’s soundtrack for The Yellow Rolls Royce or Maurice Jarre’s The Collector on my turntable, listen to it, and feel like the movie was mine.

 

I’ve replaced most of my LPs with CDs by now, but I’ve still kept most of those soundtracks. When I dust them off from time to time, there is still a palpable connection with the movies that shaped my early teens.

democracy and home theater

It didn’t occur to me back then that one day, in the not-so-distant future, I would be able to own not only a piece of memorabilia but the actual movie. Until then, we, the simple folk who loved movies, lived off breadcrumbsa poster here, a lobby card there, an original soundtrack. Owning a copy of a movie was strictly the privilege of Hollywood’s power elite.

 

But a seismic change began in the late ‘70s. Starting with Betamax and VHS, and then with LaserDiscs, movies began to appear one after the other on tape or disc. I remember the nearly bankrupt 20th Century Fox coming out with its catalog movies on both tape formats.

 

I had read that Beta was the superior format so I bet my money on an early Betamax machine. I think I bought my first prerecorded tape from the now defunct chain Video Shack on the corner of Broadway and 49 Street on Times Square. It was George Cukor’s A Star is Born. The movie itself was of course the main attractionand it didn’t even cross my mind that it was cropped. What mattered most was that I could own itin glorious stereophonic sound, no less.

 

It took a couple of years for me to realize the importance of the video revolution. Not only could I have the soundtracks to movies I loved, I could actually have the movies themselves! Suddenly, Ian underprivileged, powerless movie buffowned what the privileged and powerful Hollywood establishment owned, and I felt equal to them. I equated that with real democracymovie wealth that could be shared by all.

 

We don’t often view this important change from that perspective. But as far as I’m concerned, the real story is that the average person who had the space and could afford a home theater could now feel like a Hollywood mogul. The very fact we could experience our own copy of a movie in our own home made us feel more privileged and, yes, equal.

 

My collecting habit has continued unabated over the years. But, for me, the real benefit of yearning to experience a movie in a theater-like environment is that it has led to a career as a home theater designer. Good things can happen when you least plan for them.

—Theo Kalomirakis

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,ooo discs. Theo is the
Executive Director of Rayva.

The Heartaches of Movie Collecting & Streaming

John Sciacca’s piece about his problems streaming movies on Netflix really struck a chord with me, so I’ve decided to share some of my own experiences.

 

I’m an avid collector of movies. (The video above will give you a good idea of exactly how avid I am.) Over the years, I’ve bought enough DVDs and Blu-ray discs that I’ll never have to worry about running out of movies to see. Instead, I’m worrying about running out of space! There’s no more room left on the shelves of my storage room. 

 

To solve the problem, I got a Kaleidescape player and transferred most of my DVDs onto it. This not only alleviated the storage problem, it also made my whole collection instantly accessible. With my entire collection at my fingertips, I started watching movies I hadn’t seen in years.

movie collecting

I’ve also started discovering various streaming services and, in the process, have became less dependent on physical media. I’ve found titles for streaming that I’ve always wanted to see that aren’t available on DVD or Blu-ray.

 

And as a diehard collector, I don’t rent themI buy them. Not because I have money to burn, but because whether on Netflix, Amazon Prime, or any other streaming service, a title can be available one day and gone the next. So, to make sure I can always see a movie when I’m in the mood for it, instead of renting, I buy.

 

But that doesn’t really solve the problem. Buying a movie from a streaming service instead of renting doesn’t guarantee you’ll always have access to it. A service can lose the rights to a titleor group of titlesor even go out of business completely. The only way to avoid losing what you’ve bought is to download and store the movies on a hard drive so you’ll always have them. That’s the ultimate protection for anal collectors like me. 

 

Now, if I could only find the time to start downloading all those titles . . . It never ends.

—Theo Kalomirakis

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,ooo discs. Theo is the
Executive Director of Rayva.