Theo Kalomirakis Tag

A Visit to the Leon Loft

I had heard a lot about Leon Speakers and the artistic culture that permeates the company. Noah Kaplan, its CEO, is the driving force behind Leon in more than one way. He runs a well-oiled machine that is producing top-performance speakers with an emphasis on customization. But he also understands that technology without design is half as powerful. An artist himself, Noah knows instinctively that design makes technology more “relatable” to the end-user.

 

That understanding defines Leon Speakers. It also defines Rayva’s mission, which is why my trip to Ann Arbor, Michigan was so invigorating.

 

Noah has surrounded himself with a team of artistic-minded engineers. The energy that comes out of the Leon Loft (as they call their facility) is palpable. When I took a tour of their offices and factory, two things drew my attention: One, every wall is filled with eclectic artwork, an extension of Noah’s artistic personality.

And, two, everybody I was introduced to seems to have an artistic backgroundthey all paint or sculpt or play music. This has an obvious impact of the work they do for Leonthey don’t see themselves as laborers who work 9 to 5 producing impersonal widgets. They are artists who take ownership of what they do, and they are proud of their factory’s culture.

The main purpose of my trip to Ann Arbor was to find out more about Leon’s speakers and how they could be incorporated into a media-room wall unit I am in the process of designing for Rayva. But my extensive tour of their factory gave me additional ideas about working with Leon besides just using their speakers for the media-room unit.

The design principle behind Rayva is to commission artwork from painters and sculptors that I then help incorporate into dedicated theaters as limited-edition designs. During the Leon tour, I saw an exciting sculptural piece Leon produces that is meant to hide an array of speakers. I recognized it right away as something that can be developed into an additional design for Rayva. Leon’s Senior Industrial Designer Rob Waissi and I are working together to make this happen. We also plan to develop a media-room unit inspired by the various pieces of industrial artwork that hang on the walls of the Leon Loft.

I spent the evening of my visit to Ann Arbor having dinner with Noah Kaplan and his Senior Account Manager Camila Ballario. Camila lives and breathes the Leon Speakers culture and seems to be an extension of Noah’s energetic personality. During dinner, Noah started drawing something on his plate using his finger as brush and wine from his glass as paint. The drawing, an impression of me, was done with the same focus and commitment that define Noah’s personality. I was impressed and surprised at the same timeexactly how I felt throughout my brief visit to the Leon Loft.

 

—Theo Kalomirakis

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,000 discs. Theo is the
Executive Director of Rayva.

The 5 Best Ways to Get Classic Films on Disc

The floodgates opened in 2017, with a great number of foreign, independent, and classic movies making it to video for the first time in HD. For those of us who love movies, Christmas came every week this past year. Many highly anticipated titles were released, filling our hard drives, our library on the cloud, andif you still love physical media like I doour shelves too. Here are my five favorite non-mainstream video distributors.

 

Twilight Time

Every month, this small label brings to Blu-ray limited editions of classic movies from the ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s, mainly from 20th Century Fox, Columbia, and Universal. The best way to keep up with what’s coming and preorder before it sells out is go to Screen Archives Entertainment.

films on disc

Kino Lorber Classics

Kino Lorber releases on disc classic films from United Artists, MGM, and Selznick International, plus a rich variety of titles from the ’40s and ’50s from smaller studios. Theirs is an ever-increasing library of film gems that as recently as 10 years ago you wouldn’t have imagined would ever make it to DVD—much less Blu-ray.

 

Warner Archive

Great copies on DVD of classic movies from Warner Brothers and pre-1963 MGM films. Warner Archive increased the number of its releases in HD during 2017, making fans like me rejoice.

films on disc

Cohen Media Group

This relatively new distributor distinguishes itself with the dazzling diversity of its offerings, which range from impeccably restored silent classics to mid-20th-century foreign masterpieces to the most recent European imports. If only their prices weren’t so steep.

 

Film Movement 

This subscription service releases little-known independent titles monthly.  As with Warner Archive, most of its releases are on DVD, but its new Film Movement Classics arm seems to be changing that, with selected titles coming out on Blu-ray.

—Theo Kalomirakis

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,000 discs. Theo is the
Executive Director of Rayva.

Theo’s 10 Best Movie Releases of ’17

Best Movies of 2017--I, Daniel Blake

My list of the best foreign, independent, and classic releases on disc in 2017 include some titles that aren’t available in NTSC. Maybe it’s time for fans of rare movies to invest in an all-regions Blu-ray player.

 

1. Tony Erdmann (Sony Pictures Classics)

This Oscar-nominated study of a father-daughter relationship introduced to US audiences Maren Ade, a major female voice from Germany. Humor, compassion, and total lack of facile sentimentality are Ade’s trademarks. Can’t wait for her next movie.

 

2. I, Daniel Blake (Criterion Collection)

This devastating drama—an indictment of the bureaucracy and inhumanity of the British social system—won director Ken Loach last year’s Palme D’Or. I have seen it three times already.

 

3. The Aki Kaurismaki Collection (Curzon Artificial Eye)

This collection, which includes sixteen of Kaurismaki’s movies, is available only in Europe through Amazon.co.uk. Few can match the deadpan humor of this Finnish satirist of human nature and modern nihilistic society. Kaurismaki’s most recent film, The Other Side of Hope (included in this collection), just opened theatrically in NY and LA.

Best Movies of 2017--The Big Sick

4. The Big Sick (Amazon Studios)

A good-hearted comedy, written by and starring Kumail Nanjiani, based on his real-life relationship with his Pakistani family in the US. The movie doesn’t strike a single false note in its depiction of the differences between the two cultures.

 

5. The Sissi Collection (Film Movement Classics)

Hugely popular in Europe but practically unknown in the US, this emotionally satisfying trilogy about Empress Elizabeth of Austria, starring Romy Schneider, is finally making its debut on Blu-ray the US. Maybe not the best transfer in the world, but worth owning.

 

6. Ludwig (Arrow Academy)

Luchino Visconti’s 257-minute epic comes in a luminous restored version that includes both the original and the abbreviated TV versions. Great performances by Helmut Berger as King Ludwig II of Bavaria and Romy Schneider as Empress Elizabeth of Austria (reprising her role from the Sissi movies) are combined with Visconti’s sweeping vision to make this release a must for fans of classic European films.

 

7. Padre Padrone, Kaos, and The Night of the Shooting Stars (Cohen Media Group)

Three of the best films by the celebrated Italian directors the Taviani Brothers made it to Blu-ray in good transfers, but the discs aren’t particularly rich in extras.

 

8. Suspicion and I Confess (Warner Archive) and The Paradine Case (Kino Lorber)

Three more Alfred Hitchcock films made it to Blu-ray this year. This completes the master’s entire opus in HD.

Best Movies of 2017--The Boy Friend

9. The Boy Friend (Warner Archive)

“Excessive,” “exuberant,” “bombastic,” and “inventive” are adjectives we associate with the work of British director Ken Russell. This Blu-ray transfer of his ’60s musical, with Twiggy in the main role, epitomizes all the director’s qualities and combines them with a visual panache that makes the movie irresistible.

 

10. Doctor Doolittle (Twilight Time)

Granted, this late-‘60s musical with a delightful Rex Harrison in the title role, is not, by any long stretch of the imagination,, a masterpiece. I saw it as a kid in glowing Todd-AO, and I remember it for its spectacular cinematography. The film’s previous transfer on Blu-ray (a German import) left a lot to be desired, but this new transfer does absolute justice to the Robert L. Surtees’ spectacular 70mm cinematography.

—Theo Kalomirakis

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,000 discs. Theo is the
Executive Director of Rayva.

Not My First Media-Room Rodeo, Pt. 2

In my last post, I described a string of failures I became involved in while trying to come up with a collection of media room furniture that incorporated technology into design. Besides the fact that I never give up when I believe in something, what continues to compel me to keep trying to tackle the media room space? Lots of things.

 

The selfish reason: As a designer of custom home theaters, I don’t enjoy as much anymore trying to please one client at a time. Isn’t it better if I can make a living from designing things that can please multiple clients at the same time? I see designing media rooms as akin to directing a movie. You do get paid an initial fee to direct, but the real compensation comes from sharing the financial success of the movie at the box office.

 

The un-selfish reason: Media room design has remained the ultimate challenge for me through the years. Why? Because it’s hard to conquer the challenges of a space you don’t have ultimate control over. In a dedicated room, I can do whatever I, or the client, wants. I don’t have to deal with the inherent handicaps of making the best of existing rooms—walls of windows, more than one door, furniture that has more to do with décor than with watching a movie—not to mention barking dogs, ringing phones, or hyperactive children. I’m a control freak, and a dedicated room is a space where I can be, well . . . in control!

 

But times have changed. As entertainment lifestyles have relaxed and the bragging rights of having a dedicated theater have lost most of their early cachet, my real motivation for wanting to deal with media room design is that I have changed. After years of enjoying movies in my theater, I now find that I want to see some movies more casually in my living room or bedroom. I don’t want to be locked in the theater to watch a few episodes of my favorite series. I would rather watch it on the sofa, stopping to check the news on my phone or taking a break to check what there is to munch on in the fridge.

 

That’s what most people do when they don’t have a theater in their home, so how can I use my experience to help elevate their experience? In the collection of media room furniture I’m designing for Rayva, I’m focusing on the two most essential things: the seating area and the area that contains the screen.

 

The seats must be comfortable and have space around them to rest a drink or a plate of snacks. And the screen must be the focal point of the room—just like an object on a stage set that is “hit” by a single beam of light. This can’t be done by just hanging a TV on the wall—it needs to rest on some kind of backdrop that acts like the proscenium in a traditional theater, where it focuses our attention on the performing space.

 

I won’t share visuals of this concept until it’s more fleshed out, but the images below will show you what I’m not going to do:

media rooms designs

            The tiny TV is overwhelmed by the décor around it.                 If you like vegetation so much, go enjoy it in

                                                                                                    the garden.

media room designs

               The TV looks like an incidental accessory instead               Again, what should have been the star of the
                            of the focal point of the bookcase.                         media wall is reduced to being a supporting player.

To be continued . . .

—Theo Kalomirakis

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,000 discs. Theo is the
Executive Director of Rayva.

This is Not My First Media-Room Rodeo

I have almost lost count of how many times over the years I’ve tried to break free from designing only full-blown home theaters. The challenge of trying to figure out what to do when there is no extra room in a house for a dedicated theater room has haunted me since the early 1990s. The question has always been the same: How do you hide the technology so it doesn’t distract from the enjoyment of the movie (or concert or sports event)?

 

Since people think of me as the designer of lavish home theaters and a staunch supporter of watching movies in a dedicated room, my name doesn’t immediately bring “media rooms” to mind. Even I forget that.

 

But this morning, I was reminded of how untrue that is as I searched through my computer trying to piece together my various—and mostly failed—attempts to come up with a media room concept that other designers haven’t already tackled successfully. I guess the common theme through all my previous attempts has been my effort to hide the technology. That may not have amounted to much, but it does show how determined I’ve been to come up with a more casual way to enjoy home entertainment when there isn’t the space—or lavish budget—for a theater.

 

Looking through the TK Theaters archives, I was reminded of not one, not two, but at least nine attempts to create a relevant media room design. I’ve arranged those efforts chronologically below. Each entry in this catalog of failures is followed by a brief explanation of why I think the effort didn’t work.

 

1992: Hammacher Schlemmer

The company that specializes in curio items asked me to design an armoire that would fit a huge Sony tube TV. No space was needed to hide speakers because, in those days, the sound came from the TV itself. What killed the idea was that I didn’t know how to produce the piece for less than $5,000 cost when the list price couldn’t be more than $2,500!

 

1995: Henredon

I designed a line of traditional-style media room armoires, meant to include electronics, for this manufacturer of luxury furniture. The collection was never produced because of a change in management and maybe because, as I soon learned, furniture retailers have a natural aversion to anything that incorporates technology.

 

1999: Connoisseur FX

Supported by Owens Corning, and with electronics by JBL, this collection of predesigned home theaters included furniture meant for sports bars. Lots of money, energy, and good ideas were waisted on that enterprise. Besides bad management, September 11th and the blow that tragedy dealt to the economy helped bring Connoisseur FX to an end.

 

2007: Prestige

I was asked to design a full-blown media room collection. The furniture was developed in China and included some very innovative accessories that incorporated technology. Prestige made a valiant effort to persuade retailers the time had come for furniture with electronics but it wasn’t able to raise enough money to get the venture off the ground.

media room designs

2010: Disney Signature Collection

Here I was again designing media room furniture that included technology, this time for Disney. Once again, lots of time, effort, money, and marketing support was lavished to produce and introduce the collection to furniture retailers. And, once more, it didn’t work. Thanks to an inexperienced distributor, a still skeptical retail industry, and diminishing support from Disney, the plug was pulled from the collection two years later.

 

2012: TK Living

A group of industry friends and I created a sort-lived company that sold home theater accessories and templates directly to the AV industry. What didn’t work this time? In hindsight, the idea seems half-baked—selling home theater design accessories and leaving out the electronics is a recipe with half the ingredients missing.

 

2013: ESPN

After the cancellation of the Disney Collection, Disney-owned ESPN asked me to work with them to develop a sports-themed collection of media room furniture. The idea excited me, but before I got a chance to design the collection, ESPN had a change in management and terminated the effort.

 

This long trip down memory lane brings me to Rayva. After such a string of misses, what has changed that I again feel compelled to come up with a media room solution that incorporates technology? Besides the fact that I never give up when I believe in something, a lot has changed over the past few years—which I will talk about in my next post.

Theo Kalomirakis

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,ooo discs. Theo is the
Executive Director of Rayva.

Getting Up To Speed On Games

As research for what I need to know to create gaming room designs for commercial use (such as inside a sports bar), I brought together a group of people who consider themselves serious gamers.

 

The first thing I found out is that nobody would go out to play video games by themselves. My new friend Brendan wrote to me the day after we got together:

 

There are two main forks in the target audience of gamers: casual vs. serious gamers and individual
vs. group gamers. Casual gamers might want to play a “wii bowling” type of game while more serious
gamers might play competitively/watch others play competitively. Groups will want to play on one
screen together, but individuals might want a high-performance computer to play on without
distraction. Individual gamers tend to prefer playing on a PC, while groups generally prefer a console
(Xbox, PlayStation or Nintendo Wii/Switch).

 

The idea of designing a gaming pod for a single player stopped exciting me after that comment. You can see why, knowing that my main goal is to design something for a sports bar.

 

Brendan continued my “education.” He wrote:

 

I think the ideal situation would be to have both a way for groups to play and an individual seating
area to attract the widest swath of people possible. But the best thing I think is to create a space
where people can come out and watch “professional gamers” together, similar to how people watch
sports now. There are groups that watch these games together now, but they don’t have a dedicated
home in NY at least.

Brendan told me to check Twitch, the most popular online streaming platform for watching esports (professional gaming). Twitch is a billion-dollar subsidiary of Amazon with hundreds of thousands of concurrent viewers at any given point.

 

If you scroll down on the site, you’ll see featured games like League of Legends and Dota 2. Brendan said these are the most popular games to watch if, as a starting point, I want to understand what’s going on. That means more research on my end.

 

In my next post, I’ll discuss the other ideas we talked about that evening.

—Theo Kalomirakis

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,ooo discs. Theo is the
Executive Director of Rayva.

Let The Games Begin

video game spaces

Everybody plays video gamesexcept me. I never got into the habit because I didn’t even have a TV growing up, much less a game console. It may be too late to start practicing nowbut nothing can stop me from figuring out how to make video game spaces exciting. So I’m on a mission to create a video-game “pod” for Rayva that, one, gives the player privacy and isolation and, two, has a visual design that’s as exciting as what’s going on in the game.

 

This will be the first in a series of short entries where I’ll describe my quest to create the perfect gaming space.

 

I started my research by asking seasoned gamers about the dos and don’ts of gameplay. My friend Dennis Burger—our resident gaming expert at the Roundtable—gave me some of his requirements:

 

• “No front projector. When I play a game like Rock Band or ARMS, I want to be able to stand
in front of the screen without blocking the image on it.”

 

• “I need to be immersed in the picture. Distractions can make the difference between
winning and losing.”

 

• “I love bass. A great, high-performance surround sound system adds a lot to the gaming
experience, but deep, hard-hitting bass really draws you into the game like nothing else.”

 

• “I need as many USB ports as possible to charge my game controller, peripherals, headphones,
etc., and I don’t want all of the charging cables out in the open.”

 

Because I’m exploring ideas for making a gaming pod visually exciting, last night I watched the 3-D Blu-ray of Disney’s Wreck-it Ralph. The moviean affectionate homage to video games of yesteryearis so much fun that I got carried away with the plot and forgot that I was supposed to be doing research. Ah well . . . I will have to see it again!

 

The next stop in my quest for the perfect gaming environment isn’t what it should bemastering my gaming skillsbut to get together with a group of avid gamers and find out what’s important to them. I’ll report my findings soon.

—Theo Kalomirakis

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,ooo discs. Theo is the
Executive Director of Rayva.

Making the Best of a Media Room

media room upgrades

having a dark area on the front wall helps keep attention focused on the screen

In “Media Room or Home Theater? It Depends,” I talked about how media rooms are a viable alternative for anyone looking for high-quality playback of movies, TV, music, etc. at home. While I acknowledged that a dedicated home theater is still the best way to go if you want the ultimate at-home entertainment experience—especially if you have the space and budget—a media room is within reach of virtually anyone.

 

Keep in mind that my comments here are directed at people who want to create a system that can provide a first-rate entertainment experience but who don’t have a proper space (or bank account) for a dedicated theater room. As the wave of interest in media rooms continues to grow, discussing ways to maximize performance in a multi-use space and the different installation options becomes increasingly important when you’re weighing the options.

 

In his post “Media Room or Home Theater?” Theo talked about the inevitable visual distractions in a media room. Of course, not every designer is as gifted or experienced as Theo is, so there are plenty of home theaters out there with their share of distractionslike over-elaborate gold ceilings and framed artwork that can reflect light from the screen when the lights go down. And twinkling fiber-optic starlight ceilingswhich many customers seem to lovecan rob the image of contrast and definitely pull attention from the screen.

 

Of course, whether it’s a media room or a dedicated theater, the room should be designed “to help keep your attention focused on the screen,” as Theo wrote. That’s where good design comes in, and an area where I think he will ultimately be able to not only place his mark but possibly reinvent the way people think about media rooms.

media room designs

my 115-inch screen and the area around it, before the lights go down

photo by Jim Raycroft

In my room from the principal viewing positions, almost all of my view during movie time is taken up by our 115-inch screen. At the extreme edges of my vision are a door and some art, which I don’t even notice anymore when the lights are out and the movie is on.

 

Finding a way to decorate a media room so the screen wall can be painted a dark color will also help to pull vision toward and focus attention on the screen (and improve perceived contrast to boot!). Perhaps a design that includes a motorized drape or curtain that darkens the front wall and helps the screen to pop would be something Theo could explore . . ?

 

He also bemoaned the all-too-common media-room fallback of placing a credenza beneath the screen to hold the room’s equipment. Fortunately, there are so many ways to conceal and incorporate gear into a modern installation, it’s merely up to the installer and designer to come up with a creative gameplan for the look of the system.

 

Instead of wondering how to make a media room as good as a dedicated theater, maybe another way to look at it is to ask, “How can we embrace new technology innovations to make a media room the very best experience it can be, while maximizing the strengths of a multi-use room?”

 

That is something I’ll explore in my next post! But at the end of the day, even the very best media rooms will always have limitations well-designed home theaters don’t.

—John Sciacca

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

Democracy and Home Theater

I remember as a young teenager how thrilling it was to be able to own a piece of a movie I loved. It often was a lobby card I would beg a theater exhibitor to give me after the movie had ended its run. I still have hundreds of those cards that I brought with me from Greece when I moved to the US to study film at NYU. I don’t look at them oftentrying to relive my past as a movie-loving teenager is like gulping down three glasses of wine on an empty stomach. Nostalgia can go straight to my head, so I take it easy!

democracy and home theater

But there was an even stronger connection between me and movies in the late ‘60s and early ‘70sthe music of a film. Owning the soundtrack on vinyl was the next best thing to owning the movie itself. I would put Riz Ortolani’s soundtrack for The Yellow Rolls Royce or Maurice Jarre’s The Collector on my turntable, listen to it, and feel like the movie was mine.

 

I’ve replaced most of my LPs with CDs by now, but I’ve still kept most of those soundtracks. When I dust them off from time to time, there is still a palpable connection with the movies that shaped my early teens.

democracy and home theater

It didn’t occur to me back then that one day, in the not-so-distant future, I would be able to own not only a piece of memorabilia but the actual movie. Until then, we, the simple folk who loved movies, lived off breadcrumbsa poster here, a lobby card there, an original soundtrack. Owning a copy of a movie was strictly the privilege of Hollywood’s power elite.

 

But a seismic change began in the late ‘70s. Starting with Betamax and VHS, and then with LaserDiscs, movies began to appear one after the other on tape or disc. I remember the nearly bankrupt 20th Century Fox coming out with its catalog movies on both tape formats.

 

I had read that Beta was the superior format so I bet my money on an early Betamax machine. I think I bought my first prerecorded tape from the now defunct chain Video Shack on the corner of Broadway and 49 Street on Times Square. It was George Cukor’s A Star is Born. The movie itself was of course the main attractionand it didn’t even cross my mind that it was cropped. What mattered most was that I could own itin glorious stereophonic sound, no less.

 

It took a couple of years for me to realize the importance of the video revolution. Not only could I have the soundtracks to movies I loved, I could actually have the movies themselves! Suddenly, Ian underprivileged, powerless movie buffowned what the privileged and powerful Hollywood establishment owned, and I felt equal to them. I equated that with real democracymovie wealth that could be shared by all.

 

We don’t often view this important change from that perspective. But as far as I’m concerned, the real story is that the average person who had the space and could afford a home theater could now feel like a Hollywood mogul. The very fact we could experience our own copy of a movie in our own home made us feel more privileged and, yes, equal.

 

My collecting habit has continued unabated over the years. But, for me, the real benefit of yearning to experience a movie in a theater-like environment is that it has led to a career as a home theater designer. Good things can happen when you least plan for them.

—Theo Kalomirakis

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,ooo discs. Theo is the
Executive Director of Rayva.

Dangal

Netflix Dangal

I have been a fan of Bollywood movies since I was still living in Greece. They’re usually melodramatic but always sincerely heartfelt, with family relationships providing the core of most plots.

 

Bollywood reminds me of the Greek movies of the ‘60s, which is considered the golden era of Greek commercial cinema. In both Greek and Indian movies, the drama usually revolves around a disciplinarian patriarch and a sonor a daughterwho want to escape the father’s rule and pursue their own destiny (usually by marrying the one they love). It’s a well-honed formula that works most of the time because nobody is trying to shove some political message down people’s throats. That family life complies to societal rules is the accepted reality in India, and the audience never gets tired of seeing their experience magnified on the big screen.

 

Dangal is no exception to this formula. Against the accepted tradition that wrestling is a man’s sport, a father (superstar Aamir Kahn in one of his most disciplined performances) trains his two reluctant daughters to become word-famous wrestling champions. The girls try to rebel at first but eventually succumb to their father’s wishes because they realize that his heart is in the right placehe wants to see his kids to bring glory to their country and family

 

In an American movie, the girls would have become independent and left their father behind, with his ambitions for them crushed. But this is an Indian movie that’s a true mirror image of Indian culture. Whether, as westerners, we accept itor even like itthe message is that, in India, family is king and “father knows best.”

 

I was surprised to read in the NY Times recently that Dangal broke attendance records not just in India but also in China. In just two months, it took in more than $194 milliona number that, until then, had been only achieved by Hollywood blockbusters like Transformers, Guardians of the Galaxy, and Star Trek.

 

I’m not usually a social commentator, but this highly unusual performance of a non-Hollywood film has me thinking: Are audiences around the world getting tired of movies built around special effects? Could it be that people are identifying with something more substantial and satisfying than a premise put together by a committee after “market research? In the case of Dangal, that “something” is a beating heart and a culture that audiences can identify with

Theo Kalomirakis

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,ooo discs. Theo is the
Executive Director of Rayva.